Medication for Gastroparesis

Unfortunately, medications to treat gastroparesis are limited. Most of them are used to treat symptoms and not the underlying disorder which limits effectiveness.

Aciphex– Used for GERD.

Ativan – used to control nausea, but causes extreme drowsiness.

Bethanechol – Used to stimulate esophageal motility.

Compazine– Used to control nausea, but can cause drowsiness, restlessness, etc.

Domperidone– Not FDA approved, but still available at compounding pharmacies in the US, or in other countries.   It may cause a prolonged QT interval on the EKG which can lead to sudden cardiac arrest, especially when used in conjunction with certain other medications.

Erythromycin– Often used for motility, but typically is not very effective especially if not taken with nausea meds. It may cause a prolonged QT interval on the EKG which can lead to sudden cardiac arrest, especially when used in conjunction with certain other medications.

Marinol– Approved Marijuana drug that is given to chemo patients or others with severe nausea. 

Nexium– Used for GERD as well as for healing an esophagus damaged by acid.

Periactin (cyproheptadine)– Used to relax the pyloric sphincter and as an appetite stimulant.

Promethazine– Used for nausea, but can cause drowsiness and restlessness.

PrevacidPrilosec- Used for GERD .

Reglan– Used for nausea relief and to increase motility.  Unfortunately, it is not very well tolerated by many patients and currently has a black-box warning from the FDA.

Tricyclic Antidepressants (Elavil, nortriptyline, etc)– in small doses, these can help with nausea.  

Zofran– Used for nausea.